ING Bank Śląski | Annual Report 2014

ING BANK ŚLĄSKI

ING BANK ŚLĄSKIAnnual Report 2014

5. Financial assets and liabilities

5.1. Classification

The Group classifies financial instruments to the following categories: financial assets and liabilities valued at fair value through profit and loss, loans and receivables, investments held to maturity, available for sale financial assets.

5.1.1. Financial assets and liabilities valued at fair value through profit and loss

 These are financial assets or financial liabilities that meet either of the following conditions:

  • are classified as held for trading. A financial asset or financial liability is classified as held for trading if it is: acquired or incurred principally for the purpose of selling or repurchasing it in the near term or are a part of a portfolio of identified financial instruments that are managed together and for which there is evidence of a recent actual pattern of short-term profit-taking. Derivatives are also classified as held for trading (other than those that are designated and effective hedging instruments),
  • upon initial recognition it is designated by the Group as at fair value through profit and loss. Such designation can be made only if:
    • the designated financial asset or financial liability is a hybrid instrument containing one or many embedded derivatives, which qualify for separate recognition and embedded derivatives cannot change significantly the cash flows resulting from the host contract or separation of embedded derivative is forbidden; 
    • usage of such classification of financial asset or liability eliminates or decreases significantly the inconsistency of measurement or recognition (so called accounting difference due to various methods of assets and liabilities valuation or various recognition of gains and losses attributable to them); 
    • the group of financial assets and liabilities or both categories is managed properly, and its results are measured using fair value, in accordance with documented risk management principles or the Group’s investment strategy.
5.1.2. Investment held to maturity 

Those are the financial assets other than derivatives with payments specified or possible to specify and with the maturity date specified, other than those defined as loans or receivables, which the Group intends to and is able to hold by the maturity date. In case of sale or reclassification of more than an insignificant amount of held-to-maturity investments in relation to the total held-to-maturity investments before maturity all the assets of this category are reclassified to the available for sale category. In such a case, the Group must not classify any financial assets as investments held to maturity for 2 years.  

The above mentioned sanction is not applied: 

  • if sale was so close to maturity (for example, less than three months before maturity) that changes in the market rate of interest would not have a significant effect on the asset’s fair value,
  • if the entity has collected substantially all of the financial asset’s original principal through scheduled payments or prepayments, or
  • for an isolated event that is beyond the entity’s control, is non-recurring and could not have been reasonably anticipated by the entity.
5.1.3. Loans and receivables

Loans and receivables are non-derivative financial assets with fixed or determinable payments that are not quoted in an active market, other than:

  • those that the entity intends to sell immediately or in the near term, which are classified as held for trading, and those that the entity upon initial recognition designates at fair value through profit and loss; 
  • those that the entity upon initial recognition designates as available for sale; 
  • those for which the holder may not recover substantially all of its initial investment, other than because of credit deterioration, which are classified as available for sale.

Loans and receivables include loans and cash loans extended to other banks and clients including repurchased debt claims, debt securities reclassified from the portfolio of financial assets available for sale and debt securities not listed on the active market, that comply with the definition of loans and receivables.

5.1.4. Financial assets available for sale

Available-for-sale financial assets are those non-derivative financial assets that are designated as available for sale or are not classified as loans and receivables, held-to-maturity investments or financial assets at fair value through profit and loss.

5.1.5. Other financial liabilities

Financial liabilities being a contractual obligation to deliver cash or other financial asset to another entity not valued at fair value through profit and loss, being a deposit or loan received.

5.1.6. Financial guarantees

A financial guarantee contract is a contract that requires the issuer to make specified payments to reimburse the holder for a loss it incurs because a specified debtor fails to make payment when due in accordance with the original or modified terms of a debt instrument.

5.2. Recognition

The Group recognizes financial assets or liabilities on the balance sheet when, and only when it becomes a party to the contractual provisions of the instrument. Purchase and sale transactions of financial assets valued at fair value through profit and loss, held-to-maturity and available for sale are recognized, in accordance with accounting policies applied to all transactions of a certain type, at the settlement date, the date on which the asset is delivered to an entity or by an entity. Loans and receivables are recognized on distribution of the cash to borrower.

5.3. Derecognition 

The Group derecognises a financial asset when, and only when: the contractual rights to the cash flows from the financial asset expire or the Group transfers the contractual right to receipt of the cash flow from the financial asset. 

On transferring a financial asset, the Group evaluates the extent to which it retains the risks and rewards of ownership of the financial asset. Accordingly, where the Group:

  • transfers substantially all the risks and rewards of ownership of the financial asset, it derecognises the financial asset,
  • retains substantially all the risks and rewards of ownership of the financial asset, it continues to recognise the financial asset,
  • neither transfers nor retains substantially all the risks and rewards of ownership of the financial asset, it the Group determines whether it has retained control of the financial asset. In this case if the Group has retained control, it continues to recognise the financial asset, and if the Group has not retained control, it derecognises the financial asset to the extent of its continuing involvement in the financial asset.

The Group removes a financial liability (or a part of a financial liability) from its balance sheet when, and only when the obligation specified in the contract is satisfied or cancelled or expires. 

The Group derecognizes loans and receivables or their part from its balance sheet, if the rights pertaining to the credit agreement expire, the Group waives such rights, or sells the loan.

The Group most frequently writes down receivables as impairment loss when irrevocability of financial assets is declared, and also when repayment claim costs exceed the amount of the receivable.

The amounts of receivables written down as loss and recovered thereafter diminish the value of impairment loss in the income statement.

5.4. Measurement

When a financial asset or financial liability is recognised initially, it is measured at its fair value plus, in the case of a financial asset or financial liability not carried at fair value through profit and loss, transaction costs that are directly attributable to the acquisition or issue of the financial asset or financial liability.

After initial recognition, the Group measures financial assets, including derivatives that are assets, at their fair values, except for the following financial assets:

  • loans and receivables which are measured at amortized cost using the effective interest method,
  • held-to-maturity investments which are measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method,
  • investments in equity instruments that do not have a quoted market price in an active market and their fair value cannot be reliably measured, and derivatives that are linked to and must be settled by delivery of such unquoted equity instruments, which are measured at cost.

After initial recognition, all financial liabilities are measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method, except for:

  • financial liabilities carried at fair value through profit and loss. Such liabilities, including derivatives that are liabilities, are measured at fair value except for a derivative liability that is linked to and must be settled by delivery of an unquoted equity instrument which fair value cannot be reliably measured, are measured at cost,
  • financial liabilities resulting from the transfer of a financial asset which does not qualify for being excluded from the balance sheet or recognised on a continuing involvement basis.

The other financial liabilities are measured at amortised cost or the amount of due payment. 

Granted financial guarantees are measured at the higher of:

  • the amount being the most appropriate estimation of the expenditures needed to fulfil the current obligation arising from the financial guarantee, upon consideration of the probability of materialisation thereof;
  • the amount recognised at the initial entry, adjusted with the settled amount of commission received for granting the guarantee.

5.5. Reclassification

A particular financial asset classified as available-for-sale may be reclassified from this category should it fulfil the definition of loans and receivables and should the Group intend and be able to maintain this financial asset in the foreseeable future or until its maturity. Fair value of the financial asset on the reclassification date is deemed as its new cost or new amortised cost, respectively.  

In the event of a maturing financial asset, the profits or losses recognised as equity until the date of reclassification are amortised and carried through the income statement for the remaining term until maturity. All differences between the new amortised cost and the amortisation amount are amortised for the remaining term until the instrument’s maturity, similarly to the amortisation of premium or discount. Amortisation is based on the effective interest rate method.

5.6. Gains and losses resulting from subsequent measurement 

A gain or loss arising from a change in the fair value of a financial asset or financial liability that is not part of a hedging relationship is recognised, as follows:

  • a gain or loss on a financial asset or financial liability classified as at fair value through profit and loss is recognised in the income statement;
  • a gain or loss on an available-for-sale financial asset is recognized directly in equity through list of changes in equity. 

The interest calculated using the effective interest rate method is recognised in the income statement. 

As of impairment of items of financial assets or a group of financial assets, the Group carries the amount of contractual interest not paid at the impairment date through profit and loss. Since then, the Group accrues interest on the items of financial assets or a group of financial assets less the impairment charge. Interest is accrued at the interest rate used to calculate the impairment charge for the financial assets affected. Later, the value is adjusted with the contractual interest paid in a given period. 

Dividends on an available-for-sale equity instrument are recognised in the income statement  when the entity’s right to receive payment is established. 

Foreign exchange gains and losses arising from a change in the fair value of a non monetary financial asset available for sale denominated in foreign currency are recognized directly in equity. Foreign exchange gains and losses arising from monetary financial assets (e.g. debt securities) denominated in foreign currency are recognized directly in the income statement. 

At the moment of derecognition of financial assets from the balance sheet, cumulated gains and losses recognized previously in equity, are transferred to the income statement. 

If any objective evidence exists that a financial asset or group of financial assets is impaired, the Group recognizes impairment in accordance with the established rules of determination of impairment of financial assets.

The fair value of financial assets and liabilities quoted in an active market (including securities) is determined on the basis of the bid price for long position and offer price for short position. Valuation techniques include using recent arm’s length market transactions between knowledgeable, willing parties, if available, discounted cash flow analysis and option pricing models and other techniques used by market members. The fair value of financial assets and liabilities is determined with the use of the prudent valuation approach and is based on the guidelines given in the technical standards of the European Banking Authority (EBA – Article 105(14) of the Regulation EU 575/2013 published in March 2014). This approach aims at determining the fair value with a high, 90%, confidence level, considering uncertain market pricing and closing cost.

Market activity is assessed on the basis of frequency and the volume of effected transactions as well as access to information about quoted prices which by and large should be delivered on a continuous basis.

The main market and the most beneficial one at the same time is the market the Bank can access and on which in normal conditions it would enter into sale/purchase transactions for the item of assets or transfer of a liability.

Based on the employed methods of determining the fair value, financial assets/liabilities are classified to the following categories:

  • Level I: financial assets/liabilities measured directly on the basis of prices quoted in the active market, 
  • Level II: financial assets/liabilities measured on the basis of measurement techniques based on assumptions using data from an active market or market observations,
  • Level III: financial assets/liabilities measured on the basis of measurement techniques commonly used by the market players, the assumptions of which are not based on data from an active market.

The Group verifies on a monthly basis whether any changes occurred to the quality of the input data used for individual measurement techniques and determines the reasons and their impact on the fair value calculation for the component of financial assets/liabilities. Each identified case is reviewed individually. Following detailed analyses, the Group takes a decision whether its identification entails any changes to the approach for fair value measurement or not. 

In justified circumstances, the Group decides to make changes to the fair value measurement methodology and their effective date construed as the circumstances change date. Then, it assesses the impact of changes on the classification to the individual categories of the fair value measurement hierarchy. Any amendments to the measurement methodology and its rationale are subject to detailed disclosures in a separate note to the financial statements.

5.7. Derivative instruments and hedge accounting

Derivative instruments are valued at fair value without cost of transactions, which are to be incurred at the moment of its sale. The base of initial fair value measurement of derivative instruments is value at cost, i.e. fair value of received or paid amount.

The Group separates and recognizes in the balance sheet derivative instruments being a component of hybrid instruments. A hybrid (combined) instrument includes a non-derivative host contract and derivative instrument, which causes some or all of the cash flows arising from the host contract to be modified according to a specified interest rate, financial instrument price, commodity price, foreign exchange rate, index of prices or rates, credit rating or credit index, or other variable. 

The Group separates embedded derivatives from the host contract and accounts for them as a derivative if, and only if the economic characteristics and risks of the embedded derivative are not closely related to the economic characteristics and risks of the host contract, and the host contract is not valued at fair value through profit and loss. 

An embedded derivative is valued at fair value, and its changes are recognized in income statement.

The Group uses derivative instruments in order to hedge against FX and interest rate risk, arising from activity of the Group. Those derivatives, which were not designated as hedge instruments pursuant to the principles of hedge accounting, are classified as trading instruments and evaluated in fair value.

5.7.1. Hedge accounting

Hedge accounting presents the offset effects of fair value changes of both hedging instruments and hedged items which impact the income statement. 

The Group defines certain derivatives for hedging fair value or cash flows. The Group uses hedge accounting, if the following conditions are met: 

  • formalised documentation of the hedging relationship was prepared when the hedging was established. The documentation sets out the purpose of risk management and the hedging strategy adopted by the Group. In the documentation, the Group designates the hedging instrument to hedge a given position or transaction, and specifies the type of risk to be hedged against. The Group specifies the manner for assessing the effectiveness of the hedging instrument in compensating for changes in cash flows due to the hedged transaction in terms of mitigation of risk the Group hedges against,
  • the hedging instrument and hedged instrument are similar, especially nominal value, maturity date and volatility for interest rate and foreign exchange changes,
  • the hedge is expected to be highly effective in achieving offsetting changes in fair value or cash flows attributable to the hedged risk, consistently with the originally documented risk management strategy for that particular hedging relationship,
  • for cash flow hedges, a forecast transaction that is the subject of the hedge must be highly probable and must present an exposure to variations in cash flows that could ultimately affect profit or loss,
  • the effectiveness of the hedge may be assessed credibly, so the fair value of the hedged item or the cash flows of the said item as well as fair value of a hedge instrument may be valued credibly,
  • the hedge is assessed on an ongoing basis and determined actually to have been highly effective throughout the financial reporting periods for which the hedge was designated.
a) Fair value hedge

Fair value hedge: a hedge of the exposure to changes in fair value of a recognised asset or liability or an unrecognised firm commitment, or an identified portion of such an asset, liability or firm commitment, that is attributable to a particular risk and could affect the income statement.

A fair value hedge is accounted for as follows: the gain or loss from remeasuring the hedging instrument at fair value (i.e. for a derivative hedging instrument) is recognised in the income statement; the gain or loss on the hedged item attributable to the hedged risk adjust the carrying amount of the hedged item and are recognised in income statement. In view of the above, any ineffectiveness of the strategy (i.e. lack of full compensation for changes to the fair value of the hedged item and changes to the fair value of the hedged instrument) is immediately disclosed in the income statement. 

If a hedged item is a component of financial assets available for sale, the profit or loss resulting from the hedged risk is included in the income statement, and the profit or loss resulting from non-hedged risk is included in equity. 

The Group applies the fair value hedge accounting in order to hedge changes in fair value of fixed-rate debt instruments classified to the portfolio of available-for-sale assets and fixed-rate debt instruments classified to the portfolio of loans and receivables before the risk resulting from interest rate changes.

b) Cash flow hedge

Cash flow hedge: a hedge of the exposure to volatility in cash flows that:

  • is attributable to a particular risk associated with a recognised asset or liability (such as all or some future interest payments on variable rate debt) or a highly probable forecast transaction,
  • could affect income statement.

A cash flow hedge is accounted for as follows: the changes of the fair value of the hedge instrument, which are an effective part of hedging relationship, are recognised directly in equity through the statement of comprehensive income, while the ineffective portion of the gain or loss on the hedging instrument is recognised in the income statement.

The associated gains or losses that were recognised directly in equity (effective hedge), at the moment of recognition of a financial asset and liability being a result of planned future transaction, are transferred into income statement in the same period or periods during which the asset acquired or liability assumed affects the income statement. 

The Group applies cash flow hedge accounting in order to hedge the amount of future cash flows of certain portfolios of assets/liabilities of the Group or the portfolio of highly probable planned transactions against the interest rate risk and the highly probable planned transaction against the FX risk. 

Further, the Group applies the hedging strategy to hedge against the FX risk and base risk being the consequence of funding the CHF- or EUR-indexed mortgage portfolio with PLN liabilities using FX interest rate swaps; i.e. Currency Interest Rate Swap (CIRS). 

With one economic link between the concluded CIRS transactions and the extended CHF or EUR loans as well as PLN deposits used to fund them, the  sets two hedge links for cash flow hedge accounting purposes. The foregoing is made by separating the real CIRS transaction part hedging the portfolio of CHF or EUR-indexed loans against FX risk and interest rate risk and the real CIRS transaction part hedging PLN liabilities against interest rate risk.

5.7.2. Derivative instruments not qualifying as hedging instruments

Changes in fair value of derivatives that do not fulfil the criteria of hedge accounting are disclosed in the income statement for the current period. Changes in fair value of IR-derivatives arising from ongoing accrual of interest coupon are disclosed under Interest result on derivatives, whereas the remaining part of changes in the fair value of IR-derivatives are presented under Net income on financial instruments measured at fair value through profit and loss and FX result.

Changes in the fair value of FX-derivatives are decomposed into three elements, which are presented as follows:

  • changes in fair value arising from ongoing accrual of swap/forward points are presented under Interest result on derivatives
  • changes in fair value due to changes of foreign exchange rates are presented under Net income on financial instruments measured at fair value through profit and loss and FX result
  • the remaining part of change in fair value (i.e. due to the change of interest rates) is presented under Net income on financial instruments measured at fair value through profit and loss and FX result.

5.8. Offsetting financial instruments

The Group offsets financial assets and financial liabilities and reports them in the net amount in the statement of financial position when and only when there is a legally enforceable right to offset the recognised amounts and there is an intention to settle on a net basis, or realise the asset and settle the liability simultaneously.

In order to mitigate credit risk, the Group concludes special master agreements with contracting parties, with which the Group concludes transactions. These special master agreements provide for offsetting financial assets and liabilities in case of a breach of the master agreement.

5.9. Repo/reverse repo transactions

The Group presents sold financial assets with the repurchase clauses (repo, sell–buy–back transactions) in its statement of financial position, simultaneously recognising a financial liability under a repurchase clause. This is done in order to reflect the risks and benefits arising on this assets item that are retained by the Group after the transfer. 

For the securities purchased with a repurchase clause (reverse repo, buy–sell–back), the financial assets held are presented as receivables arising from repurchase clause, hedged with securities.

Transactions are measured in line with their intention. Accordingly, the transactions made for the category of financial instruments held for trading are carried at fair value through profit or loss. Other transactions are recognised at amortized cost using the effective interest method.

5.10. Impairment

5.10.1. Assets valued at amortized cost

At each balance sheet date, the Group assesses whether there is any objective evidence that a financial assets item or a group of financial assets is impaired. A financial asset item or a group of financial assets is impaired and impairment losses are incurred if, and only if, there is objective evidence of impairment as a result of one or more events that occurred after the initial recognition of the asset item (a ‘loss event’) and that loss event (or events) has (have) an impact on the expected future cash flows of the financial asset item or a group of financial assets that can be reliably estimated. Losses expected as a result of future events, no matter how likely, are not recognised. 

During the impairment identification process, the Group first assesses whether conditions of impairment exist for financial assets items. 

Considering the special nature of individual credit exposures portfolios, the Group defined the following events as impairment conditions for a financial assets item:

a) Impairment conditions for retail credit exposures
  • a debtor has a default of +90 DPD for a material exposure (under Regulation (EU) No. 575/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 26 June 2013); 
  • there have been enforcement proceedings instituted against the debtor; 
  • there is a high probability of bankruptcy or a debtor is in bankruptcy;
  • debtor’s credit agreement has been terminated;
  • the debtor’s/ entrepreneur’s financial standing is poor which is reflected by a relevant risk rating assigned thereto as provided for by the model used by the Bank;
  • the credit receivables wherefor the present value of debt was significantly reduced is in restructuring; 
  • some credit receivables wherefor impairment was recognized is redeemed/written down;
  • there is a reasonable suspicion of credit wangling;
  • other debtor’s accounts found under the same product segment show impairment;
  • that the credit facility will be regularly repaid was not lent credence to under the circumstances where the term of regular credit repayment is shorter or equals 90 days (3 months).
b) Impairment conditions for strategic- and corporate-clients credit exposures
  • there is a high probability of bankruptcy or other financial restructuring of the debtor (e.g. client filed for or is in bankruptcy/liquidation, or discontinued business operations);
  • a (non-financial institution) debtor discontinued to repay the principal, interest or commissions with a default of +45 DPD;
  • a (financial institution) debtor discontinued to repay the principal, interest or commissions with a default of +1 business day for banks and +5 business days for other financial institutions, in keeping with a 14-day investigation period in order to determine whether the default was triggered by non-operational reasons relating to deterioration of the debtor’s credit quality;
  • the debtor is undergoing material financial problems which may lead to a delay or failure to repay financial asset;
  • the debtor seriously breached the contractual terms and conditions, the fact which indicates a measurable decline in estimated future cash flows from a given financial assets item; i.e.:
    • collateral of significant value was sold or liquidated,
    • collateral of significant value was established for another lender,
    • significant debt was drawn with another financial institution, or
    • significant debt was prepaid with another financial institution,
  • the active market for that financial asset disappeared because of financial difficulties of the debtor, adversely influencing future cash flows from a given financial asset;
  • credit receivables are restructured for non-profit reasons; i.e.: due to the client’s financial problems;
  • major conflict between shareholders, loss of the sole/main counterparty, loss/death of a key person in the entity when there is no succession, random incident leading to destruction of key debtor’s assets;
  • the balance sheet credit exposure was questioned by the debtor under court procedure; and
  • neither the sole trader’s place of stay is known nor their property has been disclosed.
c) Conditions of credit exposure impairment assessment

The entire lending portfolio of retail, strategic and corporate network clients is tested for exposure impairment. The debtor’s credit exposure is tested for impairment at the monitoring dates in place for the regular and irregular portfolios. For each credit exposure impairment condition identified, the debtor has to be reclassified to the irregular portfolio and analysed (tested) for impairment based on the expected future cash flows.

If after the assessment we find that for a given financial assets item there are no objective reasons for impairment, the item is included in the group of financial assets with similar credit risk characteristics, which indicate that the debtor is capable to repay the entire debt under to the contractual terms and conditions. Impairment loss for such groups is subject to collective assessment. If there is any objective evidence of impairment of loans and receivables, or investments held-to-maturity measured at amortised cost, then the amount of the impairment is the difference between the carrying amount of an asset and the present value of estimated future cash flows, discounted with the initial effective interest rate of a given financial instrument item. 

Practically, for significant assets, impairment is calculated per assets item using the discounted future cash flows of a given assets item; for insignificant assets – it is calculated collectively. When estimating future cash flows, the available debtor data are considered; the debtor’s capacity to repay the exposure is assessed in particular. For backed credit exposures, the expected future cash flows on collateral execution are also used in the estimation, considering the time, costs and impediments of payment recovery under collateral sale, among other factors.

If the existing objective evidence of impairment of an assets item or financial assets group measured at the amortised cost indicate that there will be no expected future cash flows from the above mentioned financial assets, the impairment loss of assets equals their carrying amount. 

The impairment loss calculated collectively is estimated on the basis of historical loss experience for assets with similar credit risk characteristics. Historical loss experience is adjusted on the basis of current observable data (to reflect the effects of current conditions that did not affect the period on which the historical loss experience is based), and also through elimination of the effects of conditions in the historical period that do not exist currently. 

The LGD parameter for calculating the impairment loss under collective method for impaired exposures (with default) depends on the time for which the exposure is impaired.

The Group regularly verifies the methodology and assumptions adopted to estimate future cash flows in order to mitigate the differences between estimated and actual losses. 

For the purposes of calculation of the provision for the balance sheet and off-balance sheet exposures shown as EAD, the probability of default (PD) method (modified PD parameter) is applied, among others. 

The mode of PD parameter calculation makes it possible to take account of the specific features of individual products and related loss identification periods as well as the historical loss adjustments made using the currently available data (in line with the Point-in-Time philosophy). Interest and penalty payments are recognised using the cash-basis accounting method and they do not form the basis for creation of impairment losses.

The Group also verifies the conversion rate (the so-called CCF or K-factor) of utilisation of the free part of the credit limit in the period from the reporting date to the default date to assure compliance with IAS 37 concerning provisions for contingent off-balance sheet liabilities.

This approach allows specifically for identification of:

  • the losses that have already occurred, and
  • the losses that occurred as at the impairment date, but have not been documented yet (the so-called provision for incurred but not reported losses – IBNR).

The impairment is presented as a reduction of the carrying amount of the assets item through use of an impairment loss and the amount of the loss (the impairment loss formed) is recognised in the income statement for the period. For the medium-sized and mid-corp clients, after 2 years of client being in default and when it is not possible to reclassify the client to the non-impaired portfolio, exposure is fully (100%) covered with impairment loss or written off. For the segment of retail clients in the same situation, the exposure is in 100% covered with the impairment loss after the lapse of: 

  • 3 years for mortgage loans,
  • 2 years for other credit exposures.

If in a consecutive period, the amount of loss due to the impairment decreases as a result of an event that took place after the impairment (e.g. improved credit capacity assessment of the debtor), the previous impairment loss is reversed through the income statement by a proper adjustment. With regard to strategic clients and corporate clients of the sales network the Group determined the events whereunder it is possible to reverse credit exposure impairment (all of the below mentioned conditions have to be met jointly):

  • no impairment triggers identified for the last 6 calendar months. 
    If there was a significant external event favourably impacting client’s standing (accession of a new shareholder positively assessed by the Group, acquisition by the client of material funds, acquisition of new funding, capital injection), impairment can be reversed immediately upon credence has been lent thereto,
  • no delays in repayment,
  • the Group assesses that the client will repay all their liabilities towards the Group, and the impairment test carried out taking account of the expected future cash flows does not show impairment, and for the client having a forbearance exposure it is additionally required that it is classified to the portfolio of non-performing exposures for at least 12 months following forbearance identification.
5.10.2. Financial assets available for sale

The Group assesses as at each balance sheet date whether there is any objective evidence of impairment of financial assets classified as available for sale.

The evidence indicating that a financial asset or a group of financial assets have been impaired may result from one or more conditions which are presented herein below: 

  • significant financial problems of the issuer (e.g. material negative equity, losses incurred in the current year exceeding the equity, termination of credit facility agreement of material value at other bank),
  • breach of contractual terms and conditions, specifically with regard to default or delay in repayment of liabilities due (e.g. interest or nominal value), interpreted as materialisation of the issuer’s credit risk,
  • awarding the issuer with repayment facilities by their creditors, which would not be awarded in different circumstances,
  • high probability of bankruptcy or other financial restructuring of the issuer,
  • identification of financial assets impairment in the previous period,
  • disappearance of the active market for financial assets that may be due to financial difficulties of the issuer,
  • published analyses and forecasts of rating agencies or other units which confirm a given (high) risk profile of the financial asset,
  • other tangible data pointing to determinable decrease in estimated future cash flows resulting from financial assets group which appeared upon their initial recognition in the Group books. The data referred to herein above may concern unfavourable changes in the payment situation on the part of issuers from a certain group or unfavourable economic situation of a given country or its part, which translates into the repayment problems sustained by this group of assets.

Additional conditions indicating the possibility of impairment which, due their nature, concern equities:

  • significant or long-lasting decrease in fair value of equities below their price/cost of purchase,
  • decrease in fair value of equities is disproportionately high as compared to equities issued by other entities from the same sector,
  • significant unexpected deterioration of the issuer’s profits, flows or net assets as of the purchase date,
  • reduction or cessation of dividend payout,
  • significant reduction of the issuer’s credit rating which took place after their purchase/initial recognition in the Group books.

Significant or long-lasting decrease in fair value is evaluated on the basis of the following quantitative criteria pointing to the possibility of impairment occurrence:

  • the current market price stays 25% below the purchase price for longer than 6 months,
  • the current market price stays 40% below the purchase price,
  • the current market price stays 10%-25% below the purchase price for longer than 12 months.

The quantitative criteria are used objectively (i.e. their occurrence constitutes the basis for impairment identification), however in case of confirming indisputable evidence it is also possible that:

  • impairment is not identified, and
  • impairment is identified, although quantitative criteria do not confirm it, yet other available, identified and confirmed conditions prove that such impairment has occurred.

In case of objective evidence for impairment of available-for-sale financial assets item, the aggregated losses so far recognized directly as equity are derecognized therefrom and recognized in the income statement, even if financial assets item has not been excluded from the balance sheet. 

The amount of the cumulative loss that is removed from equity and recognised in the income statement is the difference between the acquisition cost (net of any principal repayment and amortisation) and current fair value, less any impairment loss on that financial asset previously recognised in the income statement.

Impairment losses recognised in the income statement for an investment in an equity instrument classified as available for sale is not reversed through income statement. 

If, in a subsequent period, the fair value of a debt instrument classified as available for sale increases and the increase can be objectively related to an event occurring after 

5.10.3. Financial assets carried at cost

If there is objective evidence that an impairment loss has been incurred on an unquoted equity instrument that is not carried at fair value because its fair value cannot be reliably measured, or on a derivative asset that is linked to and must be settled by delivery of such an unquoted equity instrument, the amount of the impairment loss is measured as the difference between the carrying amount of the financial asset and the present value of estimated future cash flows discounted at the current market rate of return for a similar financial asset). Such impairment losses are not reversed.

5.11. Forbearance and non-performing exposures

In 2014, based on the draft EBA Technical Standards on supervisory reporting on forbearance and non-performing exposures, new principles of identification and reporting of transactions with forbearance and non-performing exposures were set.

Forbearance is defined as a situation where the client suffering from financial difficulties was provided non-commercial forbearance facilities and where the client accepted new terms and conditions of the agreement. 

As non-performing exposures the Group recognises those exposures that meet at least one of the below criteria:

  • significant exposure is overdue over 90 days, 
  • the Group is of the opinion that there is little probability that the client will meet all their credit liabilities without the Group having to take  actions such as satisfaction from collateral (regardless of the overdue amount and the number of days past due).

Exposures are further classified as non-performing exposures when arrears of +30 calendar DPDs occur for the forbearance exposure or when another forbearance is granted for such exposure.
The forbearance can:

  • not significantly change the material conditions or expected future cash flows of an existing financial asset, or
  • change significantly the material conditions or expected future cash flows versus the conditions or expected future cash flows of the existing financial asset.

Then, accordingly:

  • the expected future cash flows for the changed financial asset subject to forbearance will be recognised in the valuation of the existing financial asset on the basis of the expected exercise period and the amounts discounted with the initial effective interest rate for the existing financial asset, or 
  • the existing financial asset is derecognised and the new financial asset is carried through the balance sheet at fair value as at the initial recognition date, while the difference between the existing and the new assets is carried through profit and loss. Such recognition is independent of the change or lack of change of the transaction legal form and is based on its economic content.
  • the impairment loss was recognised in the income statement, the impairment loss is reversed, with the amount of the reversal recognized in the income statement.

Briefcase

Your place for bookmarking and printing favourite pages

In Briefcase: page(s)

Your favourite pages Notes      
Your favourite pages Notes      

Send your comments to this Report

×